sci-universe

sci-universe:

These are the depictions of the most intense meteor storm in recorded history – the Leonid meteor storm of 1833. The Leonid meteor shower is annually active in the month of November, and it occurs when the Earth passes through the debris left by the comet Tempel-Tuttle. While the typical rates are about 10 to 15 meteors per hour, the storm of 1833 is speculated to have been over 100,000 meteors per hour, frightening people half to death.
Here’s how Agnes Clerke, an astronomer witnessing the event, described it:  “On the night of November 12-13, 1833, a tempest of falling stars broke over the Earth… The sky was scored in every direction with shining tracks and illuminated with majestic fireballs. At Boston, the frequency of meteors was estimated to be about half that of flakes of snow in an average snowstorm.” (x)

comixology
comixology:


Ask and you shall receive!
A comiXology Guide to Zatanna!
I will admit, at the moment, we have some gaps in our Zatanna collection here at comiXology (I’ll be sure to let DC know WE WANT MORE!), including not only the first appearance of Zatanna in 1964’s Hawkman #4 but also the introduction of Zatanna’s father Giovanni Zatara whose story appeared alongside the introduction of Superman in Action Comics #1!
That being said, I put together a little reading list that will still give you a nice introduction to one of the DC characters that deserves way more attention than she gets and not just because her bowtie game puts mine to shame.
In 2010, longtime fan of the Zatanna, Paul Dini put the young magi in the spotlight of her own solo series. It’s a great place to start with the character, and Dini (who you may have heard of as the writer of  Batman: The Animated Series) has become the quintessential voice behind character. The series follows Zatana’s adventures having recently left the JLA, and while short lived adds much to the Zatanna mythos, seeing her pitted against a sorcerer who controls the supernatural crime scene in San Francisco, a Faustian casino owner who trades the souls of his new brides for everlasting youth, and a new supervillan named Siphon who attempts to steal Zatanna’s powers.
Read Zatanna’s Solo Series
In the mid 2000’s Grant Morrison wanted to take what he felt was a bunch of DC “C-List” characters and form them into his own Avengers analogue. Zatanna was sloted for his Scarlet Witch counterpart and so a 4-issue miniseries featuring her was woven into Morrison’s grand over-arching storyline that brought all of his characters together ending in a climactic final battle. Zatanna’s story can be read on its own if you’d like just a taste, but the whole story has been collected into a couple volumes. With JH Williams III on art, it’s definitely worth a look or two
Read Grant Morrison & JH Williams III’s Seven Soldiers: Zatanna
Start the complete Seven Soldiers of Victory
Maybe this is the whole reason I wanted to write this list. Just recently Paul Dini got back in the driver seat of the good ship Zatanna, and this time brought along the incredible joequinones to write one of the best books to come out under the DC banner in recent memory. Bloodspell sees two superheroes brought together by their love for one another as well as their love for fishnet stockings. Witness a young Black Canary meet an even younger Zatanna Zatara, and get glimpses into how their friendship began while they take on a curse that is hunting down the former members of an all-female casino heist that Canary had once infiltrated.
Read Black Canary & Zatanna: Bloodspell

comixology:

Ask and you shall receive!

A comiXology Guide to Zatanna!

I will admit, at the moment, we have some gaps in our Zatanna collection here at comiXology (I’ll be sure to let DC know WE WANT MORE!), including not only the first appearance of Zatanna in 1964’s Hawkman #4 but also the introduction of Zatanna’s father Giovanni Zatara whose story appeared alongside the introduction of Superman in Action Comics #1!

That being said, I put together a little reading list that will still give you a nice introduction to one of the DC characters that deserves way more attention than she gets and not just because her bowtie game puts mine to shame.

In 2010, longtime fan of the Zatanna, Paul Dini put the young magi in the spotlight of her own solo series. It’s a great place to start with the character, and Dini (who you may have heard of as the writer of  Batman: The Animated Series) has become the quintessential voice behind character. The series follows Zatana’s adventures having recently left the JLA, and while short lived adds much to the Zatanna mythos, seeing her pitted against a sorcerer who controls the supernatural crime scene in San Francisco, a Faustian casino owner who trades the souls of his new brides for everlasting youth, and a new supervillan named Siphon who attempts to steal Zatanna’s powers.

In the mid 2000’s Grant Morrison wanted to take what he felt was a bunch of DC “C-List” characters and form them into his own Avengers analogue. Zatanna was sloted for his Scarlet Witch counterpart and so a 4-issue miniseries featuring her was woven into Morrison’s grand over-arching storyline that brought all of his characters together ending in a climactic final battle. Zatanna’s story can be read on its own if you’d like just a taste, but the whole story has been collected into a couple volumes. With JH Williams III on art, it’s definitely worth a look or two

Maybe this is the whole reason I wanted to write this list. Just recently Paul Dini got back in the driver seat of the good ship Zatanna, and this time brought along the incredible joequinones to write one of the best books to come out under the DC banner in recent memory. Bloodspell sees two superheroes brought together by their love for one another as well as their love for fishnet stockings. Witness a young Black Canary meet an even younger Zatanna Zatara, and get glimpses into how their friendship began while they take on a curse that is hunting down the former members of an all-female casino heist that Canary had once infiltrated.